Global Ed News

  • Community food kitchen in Moncton gets boost from Medavie Health Foundation
    The new community kitchen under construction at the Peter McKee Community Food Centre is receiving a financial boost from Medavie Health Foundation. ... read more
    Source: International Education NewsPublished on 2017-03-24
    2 hours ago
  • Study Finds Common Instruction Materials in Common-Core States
    A team of researchers map out out the curriculum and professional development resources that states are sharing and find that many states have resources in common. ... read more
    Source: EdWeek Curriculum MattersPublished on 2017-03-24
    2 hours ago
  • Education Law Prof Blog: Study Finds Court Ordered Funding Reforms Produce Five Percent Increase in Graduation Rates
    Education Law Prof Blog: Study Finds Court Ordered Funding Reforms Produce Five Percent Increase in Graduation Rates A new study by Chris Candelaria and Ken Shores adds another major finding in the debate over school funding.  In their paper, Court-Ordered Finance Reforms in the Adequacy Era: Heterogeneous Causal Effects and Sensitivity, they find that school funding remedies have a significant impact on graduation rates in high poverty districts.  In those districts, a ten-percent increase in per-pupil funding "causes a 5.06 percentage point increase in graduation rates."  As I calculate it, that means that if a southeastern state spending about $7,000 per-pupil in a high poverty district bumped funding to $7,700, it would likely bump its graduation rate from 65% to 70%.  In a high school with 1200 students, that means it would graduate 210 students each year rather than 195. This finding comes on top of Kirabo Jackson and his colleagues' recent finding that a twenty percent increase in per pupil funding, if maintained over the course of students' education careers, results in low income students completing .9 more years of education.  This increased learning wipes out two-thirds of the gap in outcomes between low- and middle-income students.  Not too shabby for a little ... read more
    Source: NEPC Best of the Ed BlogsPublished on 2017-03-24
    2 hours ago
  • University of Guelph officials check on mental health of students in aftermath of suicides
    It has been a trying time at the University of Guelph, where four students have killed themselves since the academic year began last fall. ... read more
    Source: International Education NewsPublished on 2017-03-24
    3 hours ago
  • In Minnesota, a Call for More Attention to Needs of Native Students
    A 2016 Minnesota law requires the creation of American Indian education parent advisory committees in the school district. ... read more
    Source: EdWeek Curriculum MattersPublished on 2017-03-24
    3 hours ago
  • Behaviour is a national problem in schools in England, review finds
    Headteachers have ‘perverse incentives’ to hold back on poor conduct in their schools for better Ofsted ratings, government adviser says in his reportSchools have a national behaviour problem and there are “perverse incentives” for headteachers to paint their school in the best light, according to the government’s behaviour tsar. Poor conduct remains a significant issue for many schools in England, and there needs to be better ways available to help tackle the problem, Tom Bennett, who advises the government on behaviour issues, said in a report. Continue reading... ... read more
    Source: The GuardianPublished on 2017-03-24
    3 hours ago
  • NC School District Wants Boys To Wear Dresses
    In SJW-land boys will no longer be boys There used to be a common phrase teachers and parents would use when school-aged boys acted up: “Boys will be boys.” Recently, a North Carolina school district tried to change that by teaching first graders that some boys should actually be girls. Without notifying parents, the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools system planned to read young students a picture book called “Jacob’s New Dress.” In the book, a schoolboy, Jacob, wants to wear a pink dress. Instead of teaching their son that dresses are for girls, Jacob’s parents decide to sacrifice their son’s mental health; they even make the boy a new dress and send him to school adorned in the garb of the opposite sex. Photo via Amazon “Jacob’s New Dress” — $13.10 Hardcover, $5.99 Kindle It took a tipoff from a teacher and an effort by the group a pro-family group, the North Carolina Values Coalition to put an end to this madness. Now, the school district will be reading the first graders “Red: A Crayon’s Story” instead. Photo via Amazon Red: A Crayon’s Story — $12.42 Hardcover, $8.50 Paperback, $1.99 Kindle WATCH A Reading of “Jaccob’s New Dress” Tags: Books, SJW, Transgender ... read more
    Source: Education ViewsPublished on 2017-03-24
    4 hours ago
  • N.S. Opposition, disabled veterans and families call on government for help
    "Why do they (veterans) have to go to war with our Canadian government to get help?" ... read more
    Source: International Education NewsPublished on 2017-03-24
    5 hours ago
  • The Facts about School Choice and Segregation
    by Jason Bedrick – ICYMI, our JPG blogger buddy Greg Forster has a new piece up at Education Next debunking a report from the Century Foundation that claims — based on mere conjecture and an ostrich-like ability to bury one’s head in the sand regarding the research — that school choice supposedly increases ethnic segregation. The Century Foundation has published a report by Halley Potter that claims private school choice will increase ethnic segregation in schools. Although the text of the report constantly invokes words like “evidence,” “studies” and “data,” its conclusions are actually defended almost entirely by appeal to a lengthy recitation of hypothetical, ideological speculation. The report’s actual engagement with empirical research is as scanty as it is misleading. A real review of the evidence shows that private school choice has never been found to increase segregation and often seems to have provided a more integrated classroom experience. There are a number of serious methodological challenges involved in empirical research on how education policies affect ethnic segregation. I wrote about them at some length in a report for EdChoice a while back. For example, some data don’t permit causal conclusions; some methods of comparison are unfair because they compare elementary grades ... read more
    Source: Education ViewsPublished on 2017-03-24
    6 hours ago
  • British Libraries Under Fire for ‘Sexist’ Bookmarks
    By Ian Miles Cheong – Public libraries in Hampshire, in the south of England, are facing criticism for the creation of supposedly “sexist” bookmarks. Designed by Hampshire county council, the bookmarks bear the words “Male Lit” and “Chick Lit” along with the names of male and female authors whose works of fiction it is suggested library users might want to read. For example, readers who enjoyed a book by Tom Holt are advised they might also enjoy a book by Colin Bateman, and so on. (Photo credit: Lucy Cruickshanks)The alleged issue of “sexism” came to light after writer Lucy Cruickshanks found the bookmarks at Eastleigh Library and brought her outrage to social media. Posting on Twitter, the author of The Trader of Saigon and The Road to Rangoon said: “I will defend libraries until my dying breath but everything about this makes me mad. Come on @hantslibraries. You’re better than that.” “I love libraries. My children love libraries. You are so important in broadening minds & challenging  preconceptions,” she wrote. “PLEASE stop and think.” The news of her anger was picked up by the BBC. She told the broadcaster that the “images of a bespectacled man with a stack of ... read more
    Source: Education ViewsPublished on 2017-03-24
    6 hours ago
  • Senate GOP scuttles Skandera nomination
    Wondering when those Education Department vacancies will be filled? Well, the Office of Elementary and Secondary Education may still be up for grabs after the Trump administration recently reversed plans to nominate New Mexico Education Secretary Hanna Skandera for the assistant secretary job, POLITICO has learned. The administration’s decision to pull back an offer came after Republicans raised concerns about Skandera’s support for the Common Core standards. The offer appears to have been extended before Hill Republicans were consulted. — “About a dozen Republican offices were skeptical that they could ever vote yes” on Skandera because of her embrace of the standards, said a senior GOP aide. Those English and math standards are reviled by conservatives as a symbol of federal overreach. Republicans also weren’t interested in another fight over an education nominee after Education Secretary Betsy DeVos’ bruising confirmation process. Skandera, who sits on the governing board for the Common Core-aligned PARCC test, declined to comment. — Skandera has about a year and a half left on the job in New Mexico and many believed that her extensive K-12 and higher education experience made her a good bet for a federal job. Continued lack of top staff at the ... read more
    Source: Education ViewsPublished on 2017-03-24
    6 hours ago
  • Tax-Free Teachers?
    By Larry Sand – California school districts lay off teachers…then two legislators move to fix the “teacher shortage problem.”  In a surreal political moment, California State Senators Henry Stern (D-Los Angeles) and Cathleen Galgiani (D-Stockton) have introduced the “Teacher Recruitment and Retention Act of 2017” which offers a novel incentive for teachers to remain in the profession. Senate Bill 807 would exempt California educators from paying the state income tax after five years on the job, in addition to allowing a tax deduction for the cost of attaining their teaching credential. If passed, the bill is estimated to cost the already burdened California taxpayers an additional $600 million a year. All this is transpiring because of an alleged teacher shortage. So, let’s see – if we indeed have a shortage, why exactly are districts laying off teachers? In Santa Ana, 287 teachers were just pink-slipped, essentially because the school district couldn’t afford to keep them. Seems that the Santa Ana Educators Association had pushed for and received an across-the-board 10 percent pay raise in 2015. The money had to come from somewhere, and it’s going to come from what would have been used to pay 287 of the newest hired, ... read more
    Source: Education ViewsPublished on 2017-03-24
    6 hours ago
  • Segregated schools persist because parents maintain the divide | Lola Okolosie
    Integration is presented as an obligation for others, mainly Muslims. No wonder many parents choose not to send their children to ethnically mixed schoolsIn the wake of Wednesday’s horrific terrorist attack, the prevailing sentiment is that we defeat such hatred by emphasising our unity. It is a heartening response to such a catastrophe, but how do we realise such cohesion when so many communities are divided along race, class and religious lines?That people from different backgrounds are leading “parallel lives” has been a recurring concern for successive governments. This may not be the term used by authors of a new report on segregation in schools in England, but it is, nevertheless, what comes to mind as we read their stark findings. More than a quarter of primary schools are ethnically segregated with the figure jumping to a depressing 40% when we look to secondary schools. When it comes to class, the report, carried out by iCoCo Foundation, SchoolDash and The Challenge, finds that nearly a third of all primary schools are segregated along socio-economic lines. Continue reading... ... read more
    Source: The GuardianPublished on 2017-03-24
    7 hours ago
  • APAIE: international education critical for Asia’s diplomacy, ambitions
    International education in the Asia Pacific has been a critical diplomacy tool for the region – one that is becoming all the more essential given the tempestuous global political landscape and a move towards isolationism in a number of countries, educators said this week at the Asia Pacific Association for International Education conference. At the same time, the region’s global competitiveness continues to increase, spurred by the growing momentum of inter-regional collaborations. “A lot is happening on the global stage in terms of politics and geopolitics, the rise of populism, the decrying of serious education; the winds of change in the corridors of power, and how they impact on education… these are matters of concern,” Anne Pakir, APAIE’s vice-president and director of the National University of Singapore’s international office said at the event. At the conference held this week in Kaohsiung, Taiwan, stakeholders considered how these events – including the UK’s decision to leave the EU and Donald Trump’s election in the US – might affect the region. “Education is the new currency by which nations are becoming competitive and globally prosperous” The “rise of protectionist, isolationist and at times purely nationalist rhetoric and sentiment” seen over the last year “means that our work, I believe, ... read more
    Source: PIE NewsPublished on 2017-03-24
    7 hours ago
  • Boston Latin School names first minority to headmaster post
    Source: Education WeekPublished on 2017-03-24
    8 hours ago