Global Ed News

  • Three Lessons of Statesmanship
    The following is adapted from a speech delivered on December 1, 2017, at Hillsdale College’s Allan P. Kirby, Jr. Center for Constitutional Studies and Citizenship in Washington, D.C. “Wars and rumors of wars” are all around us. At Hillsdale College we have been thinking about the greatest of all wars, the Second World War. If we study that war and the actions of its profoundest statesman, we can find some lessons to guide us today. We think of World War II in part because a fine film has just come out about the beginning of that war. The film is called Darkest Hour, and we know and admire its lead actor Gary Oldman and its producer Doug Urbanski, both of whom will be visiting our campus soon. We also think of that war because we have just sent to the printer Volume 20 of The Churchill Documents, the series of documentary volumes that will soon complete the official biography of Winston Churchill, of which Hillsdale College Press is the publisher. Volume 20, entitled Normandy and Beyond, ends on December 31, 1944. The film, then, concerns the beginning of that largest and worst of wars, and the document volume covers the ... read more
    Source: Education ViewsPublished on 2017-12-17
    50 mins ago
  • ‘It’s Very Expensive:’ Most Teachers Say Immigration Has Harmful or Mixed Impact
    ‘I Don’t Want People Butting in Line,’ Said Teacher Most public school teachers say mass immigration has a “mixed” or a “negative” impact on American schoolkids. The Education Week Research Center survey reveals that 52 percent of public schoolteachers share mixed feelings about admitting more than one million legal immigrants a year into the U.S. — not including those who enter the country illegally every year — or said that immigration is generally “bad” for the education system. Only 38 percent said the impact was good. Ten percent declined to say. Concerning Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) illegals: “If I’m standing in line to get a cup of coffee, I don’t want people butting in line,” said Tim Erickson, a special education teacher at Detroit Lakes High School in northwestern Minnesota and a political independent. “We have rules for a reason, and people should follow them.” Teachers who voted for President Trump in the 2016 presidential election are far more likely to agree that immigration comes with its negative impact on public schools, with 66 percent saying they have mixed views on the issue, and 20 percent saying immigration is a bad thing for schools: Only 27 percent of the teachers described ... read more
    Source: Education ViewsPublished on 2017-12-17
    3 hours ago
  • How does New York set education policy? An inside look at the mad dash to make sense of a major diploma change
    By Monica Disare – An hour before officials made sweeping changes to New York’s high-school graduation requirements Monday, only a select few knew the game-changing policy was coming. That morning, I was standing with a group of fellow reporters outside the room where the state Board of Regents had just concluded the first portion of their monthly meeting. As we finished questioning State Education Commissioner MaryEllen Elia about the budget and were about to break for lunch, the department’s press secretary mentioned offhand that the afternoon session would cover new graduation requirements. Graduation requirements? We looked at each other, puzzled. The only item on the agenda for the relevant session was a minor update on education-technology funding. An hour later, the board would vote to ease graduation requirements for students with disabilities — a significant policy shift that will allow some students to earn a diploma without passing any of the state’s exit exams. But if members of the public (or reporters, for that matter) wanted to review the changes more than a few minutes before the board voted on them — they were out of luck. Monday’s vote is an extreme example of the way New York’s education ... read more
    Source: Education ViewsPublished on 2017-12-17
    3 hours ago
  • Call to fine schools that illegally exclude poorly performing pupils
    Headteachers who abandon children with special needs must be punished, charity tells ministers Ministers are being urged to fine schools that are informally excluding poorly performing pupils, amid mounting evidence that some institutions are attempting to game the exam system. Hundreds of cases of children being removed from schools on tenuous and potentially illegal grounds have been reported to a charity offering legal advice to parents. Experts blame the rise of so-called “off-rolling” on schools that are under pressure to improve performance. Children with special educational needs and disabilities (Send) are thought to be the most affected by the informal methods designed to move them out of a school without recording their departure as an official exclusion. With pressure mounting on the Department for Education to act, Anne Longfield, the children’s commissioner for England, said some schools were “abandoning their responsibility” to give a decent education to their children. She told the Observer it was “increasingly clear that some schools are gaming the system by taking children they think won’t get good results off their rolls before they sit their exams. Any school that does this is abandoning their responsibility to children, passing the buck to others who are often ill-equipped ... read more
    Source: Education ViewsPublished on 2017-12-17
    4 hours ago
  • Why is Freezing an Effective Method of Preserving Food?
    When attempting to keep food lasting longer on the shelves, and in people’s homes, determining what the most effective method of preservation is, is commonly questioned. Over time, and period of trial and error, freezing food seems to be the best option overall. While there are many other effective methods that have been carried out for centuries, in a commercial sense, freezing has seemed to work best. How to Preserve Food – Methods and Techniques? As food preservation is an ancient practice that has been done across all cultures, the methods and techniques are vast. Here are some common practices that many people still use. Drying: Arguably the oldest method of food preservation, drying can ensure your food lasts much longer than fresh fare. Because this process reduces water activity, it prevents and delays bacterial growth from manifesting. Especially in warmer and sunnier climates, drying and dehydrating food is a practice used in compliance with the sun and nature, a process for removing moisture. Southern Italy is known for drying tomatoes, while India commonly dries chilies, mangos and spices. To do this yourself, you can start with herbs. Tie them together and hang them in ... read more
    Source: Education ViewsPublished on 2017-12-17
    4 hours ago
  • Andrée Grau obituary
    My colleague Andrée Grau, who has died unexpectedly aged 63, was professor of the anthropology of dance at Roehampton University. She helped establish the anthropology of dance as an academic discipline, continuing the trajectory she had started as a student of social anthropology at Queen’s University in Belfast, receiving her PhD in 1983.Andrée grew up in a Swiss mountain village, daughter of Suzanne Durgnat, a herbalist, and André Grau, a pharmacist. She studied in Lausanne before moving to London to train in dance and was awarded an MA in Benesh dance notation in 1976. Her anthropological skills were enhanced by her expertise in notation, focusing on the significance of movement practices in different cultures. Her ethnographic work was vast, and included researching the Venda people in South Africa, the Tiwi people of the Melville and Bathurst islands, Australia, and many projects in India and London. Continue reading... ... read more
    Source: The GuardianPublished on 2017-12-17
    11 hours ago
  • Success, Failure, and “Mediocrity” in U.S. Schools (Part 2)
    *Dictionary definition of “mediocrity.” mediocrity (n.) early 15c., “moderation; intermediate state or amount,” from Middle French médiocrité and directly from Latin mediocritatem (nominative mediocritas) “a middle state, middling condition, medium,” from mediocris (see mediocre). Neutral at first; disparaging sense began to predominate from late 16c. The meaning “person of mediocre abilities or attainments” is from 1690s. Before the tinge of disparagement crept in, another name for the Golden Mean was golden mediocrity. *A parent in a suburban school district nervous about pressuring children to be the best, says: Why are we pushing our kids to excel at just about everything? It’s no longer enough just to play town soccer; elementary schoolers also have to be on a year-round club team and receive private coaching. Your daughter’s getting As in math class? Time for an afterschool enrichment program to learn more-complex concepts—and might as well throw in tutors for reading, science, foreign languages, and dance for good measure. Every time I decide to let my 11-year-old twin boys and eight-year-old daughter find their own way, like my parents did when I was a kid, I get sucked back into thinking that I need to help them get ahead. No one ... read more
    Source: Larry Cuban on School Reform and Classroom PracticePublished on 2017-12-17
    13 hours ago
  • Want to Integrate Tech Successfully? Know Your “Why?” #TLTechLive
    Innovative educators know the importance of integrating technology into teaching and learning. Where they sometimes fall short is sharing the "why" with others in the school community. This was one of the key takeaways from a group of innovative district leaders who came together from around the country to explore important issues at the Tech & Learning Leadership Summit in Phoenix Arizona. Why Ask Why?Without the "why" in place you run the danger of administrators and elected officials thinking technology is about increasing test scores. Staff being concerned technology will replace, rather than change, the role of teachers. Parents becoming fearful that screen-time will turn their children into zombies. And, students accepting the use of technology as a substitution for drill and kill worksheets rather than as a tool to empower their learning.Can we blame them? While we intuitively know better, if you don't make the "Why" explicit you can't be surprised if intentions are unclear and success is measured incorrectly. The Golden Circle Model - Simon SinekThere is a model in place in which to look at this called the Golden Circle created by Simon Sinek. The Golden Circle has the why in the center with how and what in rings around the center. The ... read more
    Source: Lisa Nielson, the Innovative EducatorPublished on 2017-12-17
    17 hours ago
  • Heretics welcome! Economics needs a new Reformation | Larry Elliott
    Neoclassical economics has become an unquestioned belief system and treats those challenging the creed as dangerous In October 1517, an unknown Augustinian monk by the name of Martin Luther changed the world when he grabbed a hammer and nailed his 95 theses to the door of the Castle Church in Wittenberg. The Reformation started there.The tale of how the 95 theses were posted is almost certainly false. Luther never mentioned the incident and the first account of it didn’t surface until after his death. But it makes a better story than Luther writing a letter (which is what probably happened), and that’s why the economist Steve Keen, dressed in a monk’s habit and wielding a blow up hammer, could be found outside the London School of Economics last week. Continue reading... ... read more
    Source: The GuardianPublished on 2017-12-17
    18 hours ago
  • Poo, nits and handsy dads: what childcare professionals think about your kids
    Every day our little darlings pass through the hands of experts: the doctors, party entertainers, nit nurses, teachers and nannies. But behind the warm smiles, how do they really feel about our kids – and about us, the parents? Assured of anonymity, they reveal allOur whole ethos is to make children feel comfortable, as if they’re having their hair done. We use a treatment to kill living lice and then dehydrate eggs using heated air. Then we nit comb and forensically remove everything. We need to see the kids twice, a week apart, because after the first time there will be eggs left over that no one can see. Continue reading... ... read more
    Source: The GuardianPublished on 2017-12-17
    20 hours ago
  • Call to fine schools that illegally exclude poorly performing pupils
    Headteachers who abandon children with special needs must be punished, charity tells ministersMinisters are being urged to fine schools that are informally excluding poorly performing pupils, amid mounting evidence that some institutions are attempting to game the exam system.Hundreds of cases of children being removed from schools on tenuous and potentially illegal grounds have been reported to a charity offering legal advice to parents. Experts blame the rise of so-called “off-rolling” on schools that are under pressure to improve performance. Continue reading... ... read more
    Source: The GuardianPublished on 2017-12-16
    1 day ago
  • New Nationalism and Universities
    University World News was a media partner of the New Nationalism and Universities international conference held at the University of California, Berkeley, in the United States to celebrate ... read more
    Source: University World NewsPublished on 2017-12-16
    2 days ago
  • Heinz Wolff, scientist and Great Egg Race presenter, dies at 89
    Emeritus professor at Brunel University was best known to the public for presenting long-running BBC2 seriesHeinz Wolff, the scientist who presented BBC2’s long-running show The Great Egg Race, has died aged 89.The German-born inventor and social reformer suffered heart failure on Friday, his family said in a statement released through Brunel University London. Continue reading... ... read more
    Source: The GuardianPublished on 2017-12-16
    2 days ago
  • Business schools as change agents in an era of corruption
    If African business schools are to serve as change agents and play an effective role in combating systemic corruption in Africa, they need to equip future business leaders with pragmatic political ... read more
    Source: University World NewsPublished on 2017-12-16
    2 days ago
  • Will this be a Chinese century in higher education?
    While the United States and United Kingdom have made decisions that raise uncertainty over international cooperation and free movement of students, China is pushing to become a global leader in hi ... read more
    Source: University World NewsPublished on 2017-12-15
    2 days ago