Global Ed News

  • GCSE results day 2017: UK students get their grades – live
    GCSEs overhaul means results are ‘incomparable to previous years’Share your reactions and experiences on GCSE results dayOpinion: Let’s celebrate teachers as well as students 9.51am BSTOverall there has been a slight increase of A*/A grades in those unreformed courses that are still using the traditional grade lettering system, statistics show. 9.47am BSTThere are a lot of nerves surfacing on Twitter from young people waiting to open their GCSE results emails.Every 16 year old rn#GCSEResultsDay2017ِ pic.twitter.com/XhSaeb1CUknah I feel sick I can't do this, never felt this nervous in my entire life #GCSEResultsDay2017ِNever felt so nervous in my life and that's saying something #GCSEResultsDay2017ِ12 years of school all comes down too today I hope I didn't waste my 12 years #GCSEResultsDay2017ِMy parents after seeing my maths gcse result: #GCSEResultsDay2017ِ pic.twitter.com/66SBPNZG47 Continue reading... ... read more
    Source: The GuardianPublished on 2017-08-24
    2 hours ago
  • Could you pass maths GCSE?
    Try your hand at a selection of the kind of questions teenagers faced in this year’s GCSE mathematics examGCSE results day 2017: UK students get their grades - liveThey say that after leaving school people continue to have anxiety dreams about facing exams for the rest of their life. Now’s your chance to relive that horror, by tackling the type of questions set to test the mathematics knowledge of England and Wales’s 15- and 16-year-olds.Sadly, in order to make the questions work online, we are not able to present the most complicated ones – and we have got to give you multiple choice options for the answers. And unlike real students, you do not have to show your working. Although you can always post it in to us if you feel so inclined. Continue reading... ... read more
    Source: The GuardianPublished on 2017-08-24
    2 hours ago
  • Proportion of students getting good GCSE grades falls after reforms
    Share of pupils in England gaining at least a C, or 4 under the new system, falls slightly amid changes to exams and gradingsThe proportion of pupils achieving good GCSE passes in England has fallen this year, amid a blizzard of changes in exams and gradings, including a new nine-point scale in the key subjects of English and maths.There were weaker results in history, maths and geography than last year, but the picture was complicated by changing patterns of entries and some substantial increases in numbers taking the tests as schools adjusted to the new process. Continue reading... ... read more
    Source: The GuardianPublished on 2017-08-24
    2 hours ago
  • 97% of international students leave UK after studies
    New figures emerging from the UK today suggest that previous concerns of large numbers of overstayers using the student visa route have been inflated, and 97% of international students leave the UK after their studies. This data is based on new exit checks introduced last year and has prompted Home Secretary Amber Rudd to ask the Migration Advisory Committee to undertake a detailed study of the impact of international students in the UK. The 97% figure will be confirmed in data that will be unveiled today, according to press sources. In what could be interpreted as warmer language being used about the sector, Rudd commented, “We understand how important students from around the world are to our higher education sector, which is a key export for our country, and that’s why we want to have a robust and independent evidence base of their value and the impact they have.” The MAC will be asked to examine the impact both EU and non-EU students have on the labour market and economy whilst in the UK. Issues the MAC will be asked to consider will include: the impact of tuition fees and other spending by international students on the national, regional, and local economy ... read more
    Source: PIE NewsPublished on 2017-08-24
    2 hours ago
  • “The Past Is Never Dead. It’s Not Even Past”: Charlottesville, 2017
    Novelist William Faulkner had it right. For all of those nay-sayers about the value of knowing the past, the events that took place in Charlottesville recently in protests and counter-protests over the taking down of the statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee got an object lesson in how the past is never dead. Moreover, views of what happened in the past, informed and uninformed, have consequences. History matters. Understanding that iconic symbols (e.g., flags, statues) do not have one history but multiple histories dependent upon the beliefs and experiences of ethnic and racial groups is a flash of insight that seldom occurs in classrooms. If anything, Charlottesville is a “teachable moment” for elementary and secondary students returning to school in August and September. Will teachers take advantage of the opportunity? Some will and some won’t. How many of each I surely do not know. What I do know is that using the Charlottesville violence over the removal of a statue is controversial. The history of teachers dealing with disputed issues has been pock-marked with incidents of teacher firings, censorship, and fear of school board and community retaliation for lessons that take up contentious questions (see here,herehere, and ... read more
    Source: Larry Cuban on School Reform and Classroom PracticePublished on 2017-08-24
    2 hours ago
  • UK immigration levels could be lower than previously thought, new border checks find
    Fresh evidence that 97% of international students leave country after finishing studies, throwing previous figures into doubt Ninety-seven percent of international students leave the UK after finishing their studies, new border checks have reportedly found, suggesting levels of immigration in the UK are much lower than previously thought.It has been claimed that tens of thousands of international students remain in the country illegally after completing their studies but new exit checks introduced last year found evidence to the contrary, the Telegraph reported. Continue reading... ... read more
    Source: The GuardianPublished on 2017-08-24
    3 hours ago
  • Counter history: the best board games about cities
    From Ulm to New York 1901, board games have embraced stories about urban development – but can they teach us anything useful about planning?In 1666 a terrible fire raged through London, destroying most of the medieval city and consuming more than 13,000 houses, churches and monuments. It is estimated that at least 70,000 of the city’s 80,000 residents had their homes reduced to cinders. In the ashes of this tragedy, London needed to be rebuilt, creating myriad problems and opportunities.This massive rebuilding effort is the theme of Martin Wallace’s board game, London, which is set in the immediate aftermath of the fire and encapsulates 250 years of ensuing history. Players must decide what and where to build, and deal with poverty and paupers – all with the aim of rebuilding the great city district by district. Continue reading... ... read more
    Source: The GuardianPublished on 2017-08-24
    3 hours ago
  • Can an ‘Open’ Math Curriculum Compete With Commercial Publishers?
    A middle school math curriculum created under an open license goes live—and its creators want it to give the big publishing houses a run for their money. ... read more
    Source: EdWeek Curriculum MattersPublished on 2017-08-24
    6 hours ago
  • Assam: With school under water, classes on boat come to aid of flood-hit students
    Assam floods have affected nearly 23,000 schools but children of inundated Barpeta district are able to continue their education by attending classes on a boat. Anjuara Khatun, 9, is a bright student. However, for the past two weeks, she hasn’t been able to attend classes because her school is submerged under flood waters. Despite that, Anjuara has been able to keep up with her studies, thanks to a floating school that holds classes on a boat for students of inundated schools in Assam’s Barpeta district. “Our school in Tapajuli Char is under water. Classes on the boat are held for two hours every afternoon. The boat travels to the three ‘chars’ to pick students up from their marooned homes But we are able to continue with our studies by attending classes on the boat,” said the Class 4 student of Alipur primary school. Like Anjuara, nearly 60 students of three primary schools located on Mazidbitha, Bheragaon and Tapajuli ‘chars’ (sandbars) in Barpeta district benefit from the novel initiative. In Assam, sandbars formed by silt deposition of the Brahmaputra and its tributaries are populated by nearly 25 lakh people. These ‘chars’, located in 14 districts, are severely affected during the ... read more
    Source: Education ViewsPublished on 2017-08-23
    7 hours ago
  • Charter Schools Get Boost From Texas Lawmakers
    Texas joins 15 other states and Washington, D.C. that provide charter schools with facility funding, based on how many students they enroll. Laura Isensee – It’s not uncommon to find charter schools teaching kids in former grocery stores, old furniture warehouses and other unconventional schoolhouses. Since charter schools started in Texas in the late 1990s, they’ve haven’t received any dedicated funding for their facilities. That will change in 2018-19 school year, when charter schools start to receive $200 per student to pay for rent or build facilities. “It’s a historic achievement for charter schools in Texas,” said David Dunn, president of the Texas Charter Schools Association. Texas joins 15 other states and Washington, D.C. that provide charters with facility funding, based on the number of their students, according to the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools. Here in Texas, charter schools have pushed for this kind of facility funding almost since they started two decades ago. Dunn’s association actively started lobbying for it in the 2009 Texas Legislature. They finally gained the funding in the school finance bill passed at the end of the special session this August. It included up to $60 million for charter school facilities. During both ... read more
    Source: Education ViewsPublished on 2017-08-23
    8 hours ago
  • ETFO is pushing to remove Sir John A. Macdonald’s name from Ontario schools
    Controversy is brewing over the legacy of Sir John A. Macdonald and whether elementary schools in Ontario should bear his name. The Elementary Teachers Federation of Ontario is pushing to remove the name of Canada’s first prime minister from a handful of schools across the province. It’s certainly not hard to spot his name around ... read more
    Source: International Education NewsPublished on 2017-08-23
    10 hours ago
  • Tucson’s Mexican Studies Program Was a Victim of ‘Racial Animus,’ Judge Says
    A federal judge ruled that state officials’ actions were racially driven when they ended a Mexican-American studies program in Tucson’s public schools. ... read more
    Source: NY TimesPublished on 2017-08-23
    10 hours ago
  • Hastings County Plowing Match and Farm Show promises fun for the whole family
    The Hastings County Plowing Match and Farm Show gets underway. With over 300 exhibitors there is something for everyone. ... read more
    Source: International Education NewsPublished on 2017-08-23
    12 hours ago
  • A Paperless Classroom: Benefits and Challenges
    Laurence Craven – In an article based on research first presented at The Asian Conference on Language Teaching and Technology in the Classroom 2015, Laurence Craven of the American University of Sharjah, UAE, discusses the advantages and the potential issues of substituting technology for paper in the classroom. New technology is constantly making its way into the classroom in an attempt to improve the learning experience (Melhuish & Falloon, 2010) and many universities and schools are using computers and mobile devices in the classroom to enhance students’ academic performance. This use of technology can create a paperless classroom. Colleges, universities and schools have different approaches when putting in place the paperless classroom. One way is by using iPads instead of books, paper and pens, and supplementing the iPads with Blackboard software as well as using an overhead projector. The benefits The benefits of the paperless classroom are varied and apply to both teachers and students. The first advantage is simply not having any physical paper that can be lost or forgotten and that may perish over time. Another benefit for the teacher is not having to make photocopies of each handout – a tedious task, especially when the ... read more
    Source: Education ViewsPublished on 2017-08-23
    13 hours ago
  • BC government to consider funding boost for school supplies
    Back-to-school costs can vary across schools and grade levels but the average cost is more than $100 per student. ... read more
    Source: International Education NewsPublished on 2017-08-23
    13 hours ago